N-273 (Prokop, 1925.)

  Owing to the flexibility of the knight’s leap and possibility of approaching the target by two different routes, it is advisable, as a rule, to wait for the knight’s reaction by playing a useful pawn move rather than show one’s intentions by moving the king immediately. This is a study by F. Prokop, 1925.

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N-276

  When the enemy king is locked-in by its own pawn on the rim of the chess-board, the knight can sometimes spin a mating net. We have already seen one such simple position in the introductory example 263. A somewhat more complex case is shown in a study by A. Troitzky.     ← Basic […]

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N-271

  When the pawn has not advanced too far, the knight can stop it most of the time despite its very unfavourable position. A brilliant example on the theme is the conclusion of a study by N. Grigoriev (1938). Black to move draws although White threatens to push away the knight deep to the rear. […]

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N-268

When the white king approaches the a-pawn from the kingside and not along the a- b- or c-file, the knight can set up a very resistant barrier. Independently whether the knight be on b6 or c7 (as in example 261).   White king needs three moves to attack the knight. To save the game, black […]

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N-263

  With the enemy king locked-in in the corner and its mobility being restricted by its own rook’s pawn, the knight occasionally can execute a forced mating attack. It is interesting to note that the win in this position was found by F. Stamma as early as the 18th century!     ← Basic EndingsBasic […]

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