MP-962A

  We will conclude our analysis of the endgames of the bishop and pawn against  the knight with a curious position where the weaker side loses irrespective of whose move it is, despite the fact that the enemy king doesn’t control the key squares in front of the pawn (Averbakh, 1955.).  

Continue Reading

MP-961A

  From the analysis of the previous example, an important conclusion follows: if the black king is on the left hand side of the pawn and has three squares from which he can control the d-pawn available, the position is drawn because by moving withing the c5-c6-d5 triangle, Black can avoid the zugzwang. However, if […]

Continue Reading

MP-960

  Important differences exist even when it comes to an extremely unfavorable defense with a diagonally placed knight compared to the pawn. Mandelöl established it in 1938. While a similar position with the c-pawn was won (see 948.), here Black can draw irrespective of whether he has the move or not!

Continue Reading

MP-955

  If the c-pawn is stopped on the fifth rank, the weaker side can draw with the help of the rear defense irrespective of who is on the move – even when the enemy king is on the same side as the knight. This was established by Averbakh in 1955. Compared to a similar position […]

Continue Reading