P-52

  As we saw in diagram 49, the restriction of the activity of the enemy king may also be a decisive motif in endings with passed pawns. In the following study by N. Grigoriev, 1929, White wins by exploiting the afore-mentioned motif. White must get out of the way of his own pawn whilst remaining...


This content is for Premium members only.

Subscribe Login
Continue Reading

P-51

  In a similar position sometimes the promotion of the enemy pawn with check may be avoided. A superb example is a study elaborated by E. Iriarte in 1968. The black pawn is nearer to its promotion square; to compound the problem the white king is in the sights of the future black queen. Therefore,...


This content is for Premium members only.

Subscribe Login
Continue Reading

P-45

  When the goal cannot be achieved by active play and the advance of own pawn, salvation is possible only by the tough struggle for the critical squares in front of the pawn. This is nicely illustrated in a study by I. Moravec ( 1952 ) . The black pawn is nearer to the promotion...


This content is for Premium members only.

Subscribe Login
Continue Reading

P-44

  A similar idea of getting inside the seemingly “uncatchable” square by deflecting the enemy king was carried out by the «old» master Schlechter in his game with Marco in Wien, 1893. Although the white pawn resembles a helpless “extra” and the black pawn aided by its king seems to be “effortlessly” heading for the...


This content is for Premium members only.

Subscribe Login
Continue Reading

P-40

  Sometimes a decisive tempo may be won by restricting the activity of the enemy king. This is nicely illustrated by M. Zinar’s study. White to move wins. His king is only four moves away from the enemy pawn while his own pawn seems to be perfectly safe as the black king requires as many...


This content is for Premium members only.

Subscribe Login
Continue Reading

P-32

  Based on the experience gained from the previous two examples, we can easily deduce that in the diagrammed position White cannot convert his much better king position into victory. J. Kling and B. Horwitz had come to the same conclusion i.e. that this position is drawn, as far back as 1851. After capturing the...


This content is for Premium members only.

Subscribe Login
Continue Reading