B-861

  Occasionally a win is possible even with blocked passed pawns provided by a sacrifice of one pawn the unimpeded advance of the other passed pawn can be ensured. A curious case of a pawn breakthrough for the sake of depriving the enemy bishop of a vital square occurred in the game Inkiov – Haggstrom, […]

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B-859

  When in positions with an outside passed pawn the bishop “holds” that dangerous pawn, the easiest way to win is to penetrate with the king to the front of the passed pawn. Sometimes penetration through the “barricades” requires top-level technique. This is also borne out by the ending of the game Solomenko – Bessmertny, […]

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B-847

  Pawn breakthrough resulting in creation of a second passed pawn may sometimes be so complex and unexpected that it borders on the unreal. An exceptionally beautiful idea which one would normally expect only in studies of top-level composers was registered in tournament play. The following position could have arisen in the ending of the […]

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B-845

  In positions with one passed pawn the creation of a second passed pawn is in most cases the only way to victory. When this is achieved by a pawn breakthrough, the enemy pawn must be stopped in time. This case occurred in the ending of the game Miles – Franklin, England, 1976.

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B-840

  4.5.9. Bishop and Three Pawns versus Bishop and Three Pawns Endings of opposite-coloured bishops with equal material are trivial in most cases since draw is inevitable given the approximately equal piece activity. A win is possible only in exceptional situations, that is, when there is a huge difference in the positional value of the […]

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B-756

  When one of the distant weak points is not directly exposed, the stronger side first has to open it in order for the bishop to be able to endanger it. The preparation of attack on the “safe” pawn is illustrated by the ending of the game Baslavsky – Kondratiev, Tallin, 1947.  

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B-579

  In similar positions the stronger side may sometimes win even when the loss of the b (g) -pawn cannot be avoided provided it can stop the enemy king from reaching the saving corner. A brilliant study on the theme was composed by A. Gerbstman in 1928.

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