RMP-597

  In the endgames with one pawn on each side, White usually wins, especially when Black does not have a strong, advanced passed pawn. In positions without passed pawns, the victory is mostly a matter of technique, and is achieved by gradually isolating the opposing king from his pawns. We will get to know the […]

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RMP-542

  In the endings with one pawn each, White usually wins, especially when Black does not have a strong, far advanced passed pawn. In positions without passed pawns, the victory is mostly a matter of technique, and is achieved by gradually isolating the opposing king from the pawns. We will get to know the winning […]

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RMP-398

  When, in a similar position, the black pawn is in the starting position, it is crucial whether the king and the bishop cover the surrounding squares in the right way. The next position, which emerged in the game Bolbochan-Maderna, Mar del Plata in 1949, has two significant  shortcomings compared to example 391.

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RMP-397

  When, in a similar position, a black pawn is fixed on a square of bishop’s color, White usually wins by careful transformation into a position with close pawns. We will get to know all the complexity of the winning strategy on the example of the ending of the game Korchnoi-Speelman, Brussels 1985.  

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RMP-396

  We will consider a few more educational positions with pawns on adjacent files separated by more than one rank. When Black has an ideal defensive position with a pawn on the square of the opposite color of the bishop, White cannot achieve anything even when his pawn is two ranks away from the opponent’s, […]

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RMP-390A

  Certain problems arise only when the black pawn is in the starting position because by pushing the king to the edge of the board, mating motifs appear. Despite that, Black most often draws, except when there is an edge pawn! We will first look at Y. Averbakh’s 1981. study.  

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