RMP-57

  Defending from the back rank by well timed pinning as we have seen is a recipe for draw. But if the rook is any closer, knight and two connected pawns on the third row are winning. We had that case in previous example, but we will confirm it by analysing the practical game Djurasevic-Tot, […]

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RMP-55

  After examining the position with passive rook on the second rank, it is time to check one from the previous example. Though the rook is better placed here, Black is winning for the two reasons-the knight is not pinned and white king is not on the right square e1.

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P-223

  The theory of corresponding squares is the ideal tool for seeking solutions in blockaded positions where there are at least two possible ways of a breakthrough into the enemy position. This is nicely illustrated by a C. Locock’s study published as early as 1892. We should start looking for corresponding squares beginning with the […]

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P-184

  If in a similar position the white pawns are shifted one rank “up” the board, there are two possible ways of winning. This is demonstrated by a study of G. Neustadtl, 1898. In contrast to the previous example, here the white pawns are nearer to the promotion square which allows a “breakthrough” tactical motif. […]

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P-183

  Given the sound pawn structure, three connected rim pawns (f-g-h) generally win against f- and h-pawns. An interesting case arose in the game Drozd – Bednarsky, Poland, 1973. The black king is somewhat more active and a superficial looker-on might think that White will not succeed in invading the fifth rank. At this point […]

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