RMP-488

  When black pawns are fixed on squares of the opposite color to the bishop, White easily wins if the bishop is not on the longest diagonal and does not defend access to the g-pawn. This position occurred, with colors reversed, in the game Ceškovski-Holmov, USSR 1973.  

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MP-1020

  An incredible example of the knight’s domination can be seen in A Troicky’s 1924 study. Even though the pawn is blockaded on the fourth rank and the black king in front of it, White wins on the move by exploiting the unfortunate position of the enemy bishop.  

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B-840

  4.5.9. Bishop and Three Pawns versus Bishop and Three Pawns Endings of opposite-coloured bishops with equal material are trivial in most cases since draw is inevitable given the approximately equal piece activity. A win is possible only in exceptional situations, that is, when there is a huge difference in the positional value of the […]

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B-757A

  When the weaker side has multiple fixed pawn weaknesses, the win is achieved the most easily by attacking the farthest pawn which cannot be aided by its king. This case is shown in a study by Baxter, published in 1961. Corresponding squares Black White d7 d3 e6 c2 c8 b1 f7 d1 g8 b3 […]

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B-756

  When one of the distant weak points is not directly exposed, the stronger side first has to open it in order for the bishop to be able to endanger it. The preparation of attack on the “safe” pawn is illustrated by the ending of the game Baslavsky – Kondratiev, Tallin, 1947.  

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B-755

  When in blocked positions the weaker side has more positional weaknesses, the win will be achieved by choosing such an offensive diagonal which will not leave sufficient manoeuvring room to the enemy bishop. The logic of the correct choice will be explained in a study by Y. Averbakh, published 1954.  

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